Resources

Resources
We are working on compiling this list of resources to assist you in finding other services and/or information that may be compatible with the therapy we provide. Resources provided are for the Ellijay area and surrounding areas, or is general public information.

Please feel free to Contact Us with suggestions for additional resources you would like to see listed here, and we will do our best to add them as appropriate.

These resources are recommendations only, and we understand there may be other resources available that you may prefer, or that may be more helpful/beneficial to you. We will do our best to add them as well, as the information for them is obtained.


(Listed in Alphabetical Order by Topic; Click on the Arrows to expand for information.)

 

 

Acupressure
  • Patricia Babin, LMT Professional Wellness Expert – Jin Shin Do® Bodymind Acupressure® uses gentle yet deep finger pressure on specific acu-points and verbal Body Focusing techniques, to help release “armoring” or chronic tension, balance the “Qi” or energy, and improve vitality. This clothes-on method helps relieve stress- and trauma- related problems.

 

 

 

Body Sense Magazine

Body Sense Magazine Spring 2017
Spring 2017


Body Sense Magazine Archive
 – Body Sense magazine is designed to educate consumers on the lasting benefits of frequent massage and bodywork and the value of good stress management…

 

 

 

Chiropractic
  • Back to Basics – Jill Darling, DC in Ellijay, GA – Chiropractors help you get to theSpine, Spine Side, Health, Side, Medical, Body, Care cause of pain, numbness, headaches, weakness, and fatigue. Get back to the basics of health with chiropractic.
  • Davis Family Chiropractic in Ellijay, GA – Your health comes first! “We want to help you meet your individual healthcare goals, whether that is merely the absence of pain or the ability to compete in the Olympics. We are dedicated to helping you improve the quality of your life.”
  • Family Life Chiropractic Center in Blue Ridge, GA – We pride ourselves in helping our patients achieve optimal health. We offer many other therapies other than chiropractic manipulations. Our doctors and staff want to see you at your best!
  • Robert Lee, DC, PC  in Ellijay, GA – “Get your lifestyle back! Our outstanding team is here to help you reach your healthcare goals.”

 

 

 

Massage Therapy Schools
  • Cohutta Healing Arts Institute in Ellijay, GA – A career you’ll love is waiting for you! North Georgia’s Cohutta Healing Arts Institute (CHAI) School of Massage will help you get started. Our Massage Therapy Certification program will prepare you for one of the most rapidly growing professions in alternative healthcare.
  • Georgia Massage School in Suwanee, GA – As owners and educators, our perspective allowed us to develop a unique system that provides our students with the highest quality and most enjoyable massage training and education available at an affordable price.

 

 

 

Mental Health Services
  • Genesis Behavioral Health Care Services, Inc. – Genesis is committed to professional training, community education and research, as well as clinical services. Genesis maintains and provides quality treatment of emotional, psychiatric, mental disorders and substance abuse.
  • Highland Rivers Health – One of Georgia’s largest behavioral healthcare providers, Highland Rivers provides compassionate, professional treatment and recovery services to adults, children, families and veterans affected by mental health issues, substance abuse and addiction, and intellectual and developmental disabilities. Our purpose is to help every individual recover and live independent, successful and fulfilling lives.
  • Your NAMI AffiliateFurther Community Resources from the National Alliance on Mental Illness -Georgia Crisis & Access Line (GCAL) is The 24/7 Hotline For Accessing Mental Health Services in Georgia. Call 1-800-715-4225 for Crisis Assistance and Access to Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services. Other Georgia Resources for Mental Health can be found on this page as well.

 

 

 

Naturopathy
  • Natural Wellness Center of Ellijay – Nothing is more important than your health! The ultimate goal of the naturopathic doctor is prevention.  The emphasis on building health, not fighting illness.  This is done by fostering healthy lifestyles.

 

 

 

Reiki (Energy Healing)
  • Humble Hands Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork – Humble Hands Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork by Kelly Buddenhagen provides you an opportunity to achieve personal harmony. As a licensed Massage Therapist and level 2 Reiki practitioner, Kelly has a passion for helping others and believes in an integrative approach to health and wellness.
  • Patricia Babin, LMT Professional Wellness Expert – Energy Healing is based on the idea that there is a universal (or source) energy that supports the body’s innate healing abilities. Practitioners seek to access this energy, allowing it to flow to the body and facilitate healing.

 

 

 

Stretch Recommendations for Self-Care Between Sessions
These links and information are recommendations & suggestions only, as self-care between sessions. Please consult your doctor, physical therapist, or other licensed bodywork professional for exact exercise technique specifications such as how often stretches should be done, and for how long.
Illustrations © Mosby/The Muscle and Bone Palpation Manual with Trigger Points, Referral Patterns and Stretching

Figure 1 demonstrates a stretch of the pectoral and anterior deltoid regions. Place the forearm against a door frame and lean into the doorway. Note: The arm is shown abducted to ninety degrees (i.e., horizontal); it could be abducted more or less to better stretch lower or upper fibers of the region respectively.

Figure 2 demonstrates a stretch of the posterior shoulder and shoulder girdle region. The arm is moved or brought forward and across the chest. Changing the height of the arm can alter which fibers are optimally stretched.

Figure 3 demonstrates a stretch of the muscles of the glenohumeral joint. A towel is used to facilitate this stretch. Pulling upward with the left hand stretches the right shoulder region; pulling downward with the right hand stretches the left shoulder region.Figure 4 demonstrates stretches of the muscles of the wrist and fingers. A, flexors; B, extensors. Note: Extreme caution should be used when performing wrist joint stretches because of the increased compression force that is placed into the carpal tunnel. If these stretches cause any pain or discomfort in the wrist, they should be discontinued. The muscles of the forearm and hand that are involved in these stretches are easily accessible and can be self-massaged instead.

Figure 5 demonstrates a stretch of the flexors and adductors of the thumb.

Figure 6 demonstrates two stretches for the extensor muscles of the posterior neck. Both stretches involve flexing and laterally flexing the neck and head. In A, ipsilateral rotation is added; in B, contralateral rotation is added.

Figure 7 demonstrates a stretch for the extensor muscles of the posterior trunk. Both knees are drawn into the chest. To increase the stretch for the extensor muscles on one side, deviating the thighs toward the opposite side can be added to the stretch.

Figure 8 demonstrates a stretch for the lateral trunk.

Figure 9 demonstrates a stretch for the gluteal region. The thigh is drawn up and across the body. Varying the exact angle of the thigh can optimally stretch different fibers of the gluteal region.Figure 10 demonstrates a stretch for the hip flexor group. Note: When performing this stretch, it is important to keep the trunk vertical.

Figure 11 demonstrates a stretch for the hamstring group. With the knee joint fully extended, rock forward with the pelvis (the spine does not need to bend).

Figure 12 demonstrates a stretch for the plantar flexors of the posterior leg. A, for the gastrocnemius, the knee joint must be extended. B, for the soleus, the knee joint should be flexed. For both muscles, the heel must remain flat on the floor.

When stretching a muscle, bring the muscle to the point of tension where it just starts to resist the stretch. Then the muscle should be slowly stretched, just slightly longer than the point where tissue tension was reached.